. You make the rules. Many people seem to have an opinion about single mothers, and their advice when it comes to your private life is: Take up needlepoint. Forget them. A single mother can date, seriously or casually. A single mother can be seen out dancing on a Saturday night. A single mother can even have sex!

2. Nobody loves a parade. It’s not necessary to introduce your kids to every guy who takes you to a movie. Wait until you’re secure in the relationship before you let your kids perceive someone as “Mommy’s boyfriend.” Have a reliable sitter lined up, suggests Magdoff, so you don’t end up bringing children along before you’re ready.

3. Don’t lean too hard too soon. Resist the temptation to make the new guy a parenting helper right away, adds Magdoff. Until you’ve actually decided that the time is right, don’t ask him to pick up your daughter from ballet just because it’s on his way over for dinner. “Hold back,” Magdoff says. “Don’t have him take on parenting roles until it feels stupid not to. When all three of you are saying, ‘But ballet class is right by his office,’ then it’s time.”

4. Nothing but the truth. While discretion is recommended, lying and sneaking are not. If you think extramarital sex is okay, when questions arise you should be able to explain to your children (in an age-appropriate manner) why and under what conditions. If you can’t, then don’t do it. Behave as you want your kids to when they reach early adulthood.

5. Have your priorities straight. Keep your hormones in check when making decisions. Maybe it’s more important for you to be at the school basketball playoffs than away for the weekend with your beau. But on the other hand:

6. Don’t be a martyr. Magdoff warns against using your kids as an excuse to avoid intimacy—putting them between you and your social life. In other words, sometimes the weekend away is more important than the basketball game.

7. When you’re out, be out. One way single mothers sabotage relationships and act out their guilty feelings, Magdoff adds, is by talking about their children constantly while on a date. “Five minutes max,” she says.

8. Don’t succumb to pressure. My long-term relationship was a lot more than dating and a lot less than marriage—and was sometimes a little difficult to explain to outsiders. But it was right for me and my kids at the time. I did what I thought best, and that’s why I have no regrets.

9. Leave when it’s time. One of the more trying moments in a single mother’s life is splitting up with someone her kids care about. I know women who have stayed in iffy relationships “for the kids.” This makes even less sense when you’re not married. Change and loss are part of life, things everyone has to deal with. If a particular bond is really strong, perhaps there’s a way for that adult and child to maintain a connection.

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